Sunday, 22 December 2019

Wooden Terrain and Paper Soldiers

This weekend I have been focussing on getting my terrain ready for a Jacobite '45 game (more on that at the end of the post). My last post covered the making of wooden block houses. For the most part I was happy with them, I was just unsure about the stonework on the walls being as effective as I wanted.

Terrain used in a game
The next batch of wooden terrain was a couple of stone bridges and walls for the Scottish Big House. This time for the walls I used the oil-based pastels to help vary the background colour and used dabs of paint in different shades to give the effect of stonework. Then reworked my houses using the same technique.

A template was created for the bridge sides to help get consistency. With the woodwork I use a mitre-saw contraption and coping saw.
Mitre Saw Contraption - most useful for straight lines and correct angle cuts
Coping saw - for those tricky bits!
All the bits were cut out.
Glued with PVA wood glue
Painted and pastels used to provide colour variation (much darker in photo than actually is)  
Varying stone colours are dabbed on
Pastels used extensively to get variation and a feeling of texture for the bridge span, then a coat of PVA glue is applied to seal the model.
In use on the tabletop.

For those readers who are wondering what on earth has happened to the ACW and ECW campaigns. They will be completed over the next few weeks and there are two ACW action reports waiting to be written up.

The reason for this Jacobite distraction was to try out a solo mechanism used in the ACW campaign and to see if it translates to the tabletop. In the campaign I use orders and write two sets of orders for the opposing force along with orders for my own force. Once all are written, I then dice to see which set of orders to apply to the opposition force moves. As I am using a One Hour Wargaming approach I am hoping it will not be too onerous to write orders for 6 units per side. More on this if it works out.


14 comments:

  1. Very impressive woodworking, and using pastels is brilliant, they look great.

    V/R,
    Jack

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    1. Thank you. They are quick to use where all the surface is easily accessible.

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  2. Excellent looking bridge and paint job.

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    1. Thank you. I am very pleased with the way the bridges turned out.

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  3. A very nice looking table and figures. Looking forward to seeing them in action.

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    1. Thank you. I cannot wait to start the game.

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  4. More great scenery Peter. The house with 2 chimneys is stunning.

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    1. Thank you kindly. I had two goes at getting it right.

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  5. Your wooden buildings and bridges are absolutely excellent. Very inspiring.

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    1. Thanks. It time for me to get back to making warehouses for my planned WW2 St. Nazaire game.

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  6. Replies
    1. Thank you. I am surprised how well they all turned out.

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